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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Chester, SC
    Posts
    169

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    The block should not be damaged at all. Those engines are tough and I have seen one run so hot it melted the exhaust hoses and ate the flaps off of the impeller. As far as I know that boat is still running great today, three years later.

    I would find out what is causing the problem before I buy the boat, possibly just an impeller or clogged line. If the deal is sweet I would buy regardless as long as the problem of overeating is fixed.

    If it is a good deal, shoot me the number for it and I might buy it.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    North End Lake Lanier GA
    Posts
    8,121

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    I still stand on my ground of 180 is hot for a boat engine.

    When looking at my gauge 180 is 3/4 to the max it only goes to 240. It reads 180 then 240. Nothing in between that.

    A car engine runs normally at 160 to 180 in a pressurized environment where the coolant is being cooled and recycled, a boat is sucking cold water 50 to 70 degrees into the engine and heating it up as it goes threw and spits it out the exhaust.

    Most cars at 220 start to have heating issues and over heat at 230 to 240.

    A boat id expect if you think about the temperature reaction of what it takes to heat 60 degree water to 180 in less then 10 seconds, the average time the water is even in an engine, thats a considerable amount of energy.

    I know if i see my temp gauge get to 180 im going to be slowing down and letting it cool a bit unless its just that hot outside.
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Chester, SC
    Posts
    169

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    I agree that anything above 180 is hot for a marine engine, and is not designed for operation above 180.

    An automobile can run 220 under pressure and still be fine. Since a boat does not have a pressurized system, at least not a freshwater boat, then reaching 220 would not even be as bad as reaching 220 in an automobile.

    Something is not working right if the boat operates over 180. However, I wouldnt judge the motor is bad because it was operating over that.

    BTW, 165 to 180 is normal operating temperature, as stated in the owners manual.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Naperville, IL
    Posts
    315

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    Quote Originally Posted by gcnettl View Post
    I agree that anything above 180 is hot for a marine engine, and is not designed for operation above 180.

    An automobile can run 220 under pressure and still be fine. Since a boat does not have a pressurized system, at least not a freshwater boat, then reaching 220 would not even be as bad as reaching 220 in an automobile.

    Something is not working right if the boat operates over 180. However, I wouldnt judge the motor is bad because it was operating over that.

    BTW, 165 to 180 is normal operating temperature, as stated in the owners manual.
    Might be something as simple as the wrong thermostat.

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