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Engine Nut
09-22-2016, 11:38 AM
The new Raptor Engines are equipped with what is commonly referred to as a "half closed cooling system". This means that the engine block (including the heater) is cooled by anti-freeze and the exhaust manifolds are cooled by raw water. The anti-freeze that we use is propylene glycol based anti-freeze. Following is a service article that I wrote regarding anti-freeze protection levels. To test the concentration of the anti-freeze in your Raptor engine you will need a tool called a refractometer. The "floating ball" type testers are not recommended. Refractometers are a bit more expensive but they will measure ethylene glycol, propylene glycol and battery acid concentrations and on top of that are a lot cooler than floating ball testers. Here is a good excuse for you "tool junkies" out there to buy something to impress your friends with!

A normal 50:50 mix of propylene glycol provides a protection level that will allow an engine to operate at -26F (-32C). That means that no ice crystals will form in the coolant till the temperature drops below -26F (-32C). This is referred to as the freezing point of the anti-freeze.

At any ratio of 35:65 (35%) or higher, propylene glycol provides additional protection to lower than -50F (-46C). This protection level is referred to as the burst point. The burst point is the point where the crystals in the coolant are able to expand and cause damage to the cooling system. In other words, it is OK for the coolant in the cooling system of an engine to turn to slush as long as the engine is just being stored and will not be expected to operate till the weather gets warmer.

Since it is pretty unrealistic to think that a customer will actually be using their boat at -26F, the bursting point becomes the more important value to pay attention to. Following is a chart showing the anti-freeze ratio and the corresponding freezing point and burst point.

Ratio Freezing Point Bursting Point
50/50 (50%) -26F (-32C) -50F (-46C)
40/60 (40%) -5F (-20C) -50F (-46C)
30/70 (30%) +10F (-12C) -20F (-29C)
20/80 (20%) +20F (-6C) +10F (-12C)

A 40/60 (40%) ratio provides adequate burst protection for most of us. The 50/50 (50%) mix historically has been the recommended concentration because of the convenience being able to determine how much anti-freeze and water you need to use for a given system.

viking
09-22-2016, 09:21 PM
As Always - very useful information in your posts Larry!!
This forum is lucky to have you.............

Mc_Mojo
09-23-2016, 02:44 PM
Hello,

i am new here and a new Moomba owner. I have a 2016 Mojo surf edition and live in western Georgia. we have mostly mild winters here and the temp rarely goes below 32 deg F. I plan on using the boat throughout the winter. Do i need to winterize it since it's a "half" closed-system, or, is there anything else i should worry about?

thanks

zabooda
09-23-2016, 03:33 PM
Hello,

i am new here and a new Moomba owner. I have a 2016 Mojo surf edition and live in western Georgia. we have mostly mild winters here and the temp rarely goes below 32 deg F. I plan on using the boat throughout the winter. Do i need to winterize it since it's a "half" closed-system, or, is there anything else i should worry about?

thanks

The manifolds hold water so I would recommend draining them. I would look for a replacement for the manifold drain plugs that are valved for convenience of draining each time.

trayson
09-23-2016, 07:27 PM
Hello,

i am new here and a new Moomba owner. I have a 2016 Mojo surf edition and live in western Georgia. we have mostly mild winters here and the temp rarely goes below 32 deg F. I plan on using the boat throughout the winter. Do i need to winterize it since it's a "half" closed-system, or, is there anything else i should worry about?

thanks

If it was me and the temp wasn't going to go below freezing, I wouldn't sweat it. If it was going to drop below freezing, I'd throw an incandescent shop light into the engine compartment. There have been many threads showing that it takes more than a quick dip below 32 degrees to cause any potential for damage.

Engine Nut
09-25-2016, 02:12 PM
Hello,

i am new here and a new Moomba owner. I have a 2016 Mojo surf edition and live in western Georgia. we have mostly mild winters here and the temp rarely goes below 32 deg F. I plan on using the boat throughout the winter. Do i need to winterize it since it's a "half" closed-system, or, is there anything else i should worry about?

thanks

If there is a chance of going below freezing
, I would not take a chance. There are only 4 drain points on the engine ... the line that goes from the raw water pump to the heat exchanger, the heat exchanger itself, the exhaust manifold crossover and the drain plug on the v-drive anode. The light bulb in the bilge may work ... till the power goes out.

Mc_Mojo
09-26-2016, 03:34 PM
Thanks for all the replies; if it gets cold enough to freeze, I'll bring the boat into our garage for a couple of days;

Larry; i'll check those locations to see if i can find the drain ports; so if i drain those locations, the rest of the engine will be fine?

Thanks again!

Derek

deerfield
09-27-2016, 01:31 PM
The new Raptor Engines are equipped with what is commonly referred to as a "half closed cooling system". This means that the engine block (including the heater) is cooled by anti-freeze and the exhaust manifolds are cooled by raw water. The anti-freeze that we use is propylene glycol based anti-freeze. Following is a service article that I wrote regarding anti-freeze protection levels. To test the concentration of the anti-freeze in your Raptor engine you will need a tool called a refractometer. The "floating ball" type testers are not recommended. Refractometers are a bit more expensive but they will measure ethylene glycol, propylene glycol and battery acid concentrations and on top of that are a lot cooler than floating ball testers. Here is a good excuse for you "tool junkies" out there to buy something to impress your friends with!

A normal 50:50 mix of propylene glycol provides a protection level that will allow an engine to operate at -26F (-32C). That means that no ice crystals will form in the coolant till the temperature drops below -26F (-32C). This is referred to as the freezing point of the anti-freeze.

At any ratio of 35:65 (35%) or higher, propylene glycol provides additional protection to lower than -50F (-46C). This protection level is referred to as the burst point. The burst point is the point where the crystals in the coolant are able to expand and cause damage to the cooling system. In other words, it is OK for the coolant in the cooling system of an engine to turn to slush as long as the engine is just being stored and will not be expected to operate till the weather gets warmer.

Since it is pretty unrealistic to think that a customer will actually be using their boat at -26F, the bursting point becomes the more important value to pay attention to. Following is a chart showing the anti-freeze ratio and the corresponding freezing point and burst point.

Ratio Freezing Point Bursting Point
50/50 (50%) -26F (-32C) -50F (-46C)
40/60 (40%) -5F (-20C) -50F (-46C)
30/70 (30%) +10F (-12C) -20F (-29C)
20/80 (20%) +20F (-6C) +10F (-12C)

A 40/60 (40%) ratio provides adequate burst protection for most of us. The 50/50 (50%) mix historically has been the recommended concentration because of the convenience being able to determine how much anti-freeze and water you need to use for a given system.

Larry - What is the benefit of a half closed cooling system? Longer engine life? Lower production cost? Ease of operation? Also, does the system operate with a radiator, like an automobile engine? Curious. All I have ever owned were open, fresh water cooling systems. Thanks. - Stuart