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View Full Version : How long do you keep your boat?



Davpmars
08-01-2014, 11:02 AM
I'm curious to know how long you boat owners plan to keep your boats before they reach a point where they are too much trouble to maintain so is time to get a new one?

I have bean told many times that "if you take care of it, it will last forever" yes I know that, but what is a reasonable amount of time that given regular upkeep that YOU would keep a boat before swapping it for a new/newer one?

mikenehrkorn
08-01-2014, 11:18 AM
I plan to keep my BODY my whole life!!! Sorry, couldn't resist your typo..... :)

My .02....

Assuming the boat still meets all your needs, I see no reason to change. I'm a fairly new inboard owner (little over a year) and traded up from my I/O that I had for about 10 yrs. That boat was in great shape and if the I/O still met all my needs I'm fairly sure I would still have it.

moombadaze
08-01-2014, 11:45 AM
so far my boat ownership record is 7yrs

papou
08-01-2014, 12:03 PM
Longest I've kept a boat ,car,truck is 8 years .I usually get tired of looking at the same vehicle,this time around tho I may have to keep them longer:looking to purchase a villa in Costa Rica ;)

rdlangston13
08-01-2014, 12:15 PM
My general rule of thumb for all my vehicles is 10 years, Got to get your moneys worth out of them!

kaneboats
08-01-2014, 12:19 PM
I expect 10-12 years. Still driving my '01 Suburban.

chawk610
08-01-2014, 12:23 PM
Like above, as long as it suites you, or you get the itch. We are on year 4 now I believe.

Davpmars
08-01-2014, 12:27 PM
Oh my gosh... I didn't realize my typo in the thread topic until now. Dang auto correct!

I'm going to have to buy a boat about 5 years old in order to afford it. I know that many people say that boats are money pits but I think they have come a long way in reliability.

Have any of you noticed a point in the boats life where maintenance cost jumps up?

bergermaister
08-01-2014, 12:28 PM
8yrs on a 13yr, uh maybe 14yr old boat. Has seen a lot of transformation and reconditioning though. Could easily get another 8yrs+ out of it, maybe more.

trayson
08-01-2014, 12:33 PM
Until I can afford to upgrade is my basic rule of thumb.

I've had my 2000 Jeep TJ Rock Crawler since 2005. (I'd like to go a different direction with a 4 door JK Rubicon though but can't afford the jump.

I had my 99 Ninja ZX6R for a couple years until it got stolen while I was going through my divorced and didn't have access to my house to store it in. After that, I got a 2005 Ninja ZX6R 636 (fuel injection and undertail exhaust) and since it's paid for and it's still more bike than I am rider, there's really no reason for me to ever change. But If I had the money, I'd step up to a BMW S1000RR in a heartbeat because they're straight sexy.

I've had my 98 M3 Convertible since 2008. There's not much out there anywhere in the realm of affodability that would make me as happy.

I got a 99 Audi A6 Avant as our "snow-wagon" and drove it until the tranny took a dump this spring. So I sold that as a fixer and upgraded to a 02 Audi S6 Avant.

I have a Chalet Alpine hard sided popup a-frame camping trailer that our family has pretty much outgrown. I really want to upgrade to a small class C motorhome in the foreseeable future. Something that can tow the boat!!!

I got my 92 Supra Sunsport in spring of 2013. Once I can upgrade to a v-drive that will make me happy, I'll do so. Honestly, I could see my next boat being the forever boat if I get a seating arrangement that makes me happy. If the Sunsport was a V-drive I'd be down to keep it way longer. But since it doesn't have the ability to have hidden hard-plumbed ballast, it'll eventually get retired when I can afford the V-drive jump. Luckily, I added a NSS-style surf system and that's dramatically changed the capability and versitility of the boat for the better, so it's making it easier to hang onto.

kaneboats
08-01-2014, 12:34 PM
Oh my gosh... I didn't realize my typo in the thread topic until now. Dang auto correct!


Handled.

With and inboard if you get one that was maintained and you pick up where they left off you can save a ton and it will last a long time. Google 1998 Moomba. The 2015 line is coming out right now so that would make those 17 years old. Notice how many hits you get. Still running.

Assuming engine is properly winterized and oil changed, etc., the most expensive other items are stringer/floor work and interior wear/replacement. Moombas since at least 2000 (earlier anyone?) have had no wood in them so they should last forever if not abused. And, vinyl work can be done in a cost effective manner if you are willing to remove the cushions and skins yourself and just have the covers made. I am working on a new mail order solution for that which I will be sharing here in the next few weeks after my test run.

I would not be afraid of a 5 year old boat, especially if I knew its maintenance history.

saskyrider
08-01-2014, 12:58 PM
My boat is new this year but my plan is that it will be the last V-Drive boat i get. My wife has no use for the water sports and once my daughter leaves home (8-10 years from now) i will have no one family wise to go out with... at this point we will either probably transition to a pontoon boat (wife has balance issues and they are nice and stable) or just sell and get out of boating altogether. No of course things could change... if my daughter stays close by then thats a different story. hard to say right now other than i'm sure this will be the last tournament boat we will have... i plan on getting my money out of it!

New Guy
08-01-2014, 12:59 PM
Until my wife tells me we can get the next one.

bergermaister
08-01-2014, 01:03 PM
My wife has no use for the water sports and once my daughter leaves home (8-10 years from now) i will have no one family wise to go out with...

This is my fear... But I'm thinking keep the tournament boat for the kids to use and settle down to a pontoon or cruiser?

moombadaze
08-01-2014, 01:08 PM
My wife has no use for the water sports and once my daughter leaves home (8-10 years from now)

this could be me in 3 yrs when my daughter graduate's high school

trayson
08-01-2014, 01:08 PM
Handled.

With and inboard if you get one that was maintained and you pick up where they left off you can save a ton and it will last a long time. Google 1998 Moomba. The 2015 line is coming out right now so that would make those 17 years old. Notice how many hits you get. Still running.

Assuming engine is properly winterized and oil changed, etc., the most expensive other items are stringer/floor work and interior wear/replacement. Moombas since at least 2000 (earlier anyone?) have had no wood in them so they should last forever if not abused. And, vinyl work can be done in a cost effective manner if you are willing to remove the cushions and skins yourself and just have the covers made. I am working on a new mail order solution for that which I will be sharing here in the next few weeks after my test run.

I would not be afraid of a 5 year old boat, especially if I knew its maintenance history.

I will be interested in your vinyl solution.


I don't know about the Moombas, as I am not sure when Skiers choice acquired the brand. But on my Supra, I have the FIRST year of all composite, and it's 1992. My boat will most certainly hold its value as it's very sought after as one of if not the best entry level "budget" direct drive that can do ski/wakeboard/surf with tons of freeboard, etc. I also milkshaked my transmission so it has a fresh rebuild on it, and my engine is under 700 hours... some of the vinyl could use some love. the carpets likewise, but overall it's solid and people are amazed that I have a 22 year old boat.

saskyrider
08-01-2014, 01:15 PM
This is my fear... But I'm thinking keep the tournament boat for the kids to use and settle down to a pontoon or cruiser?


My daughter was lukewarm on the boat but now that she has figured out the wakeboard she has a lot more interest. I'm going to work on getting her surfing this year as well...

And maybe in 10 years im in a position to not worrying about a boat and keep it just because..

trayson
08-01-2014, 01:20 PM
My wife has no use for the water sports

I guess I'm lucky. My wife is in it for the long haul. and most of our friends are younger than us, so that helps too. She loves being on the boat and even enjoys driving the boat. She has no desire to have a boat that wouldn't support wakeboarding and surfing. She poo-poo's our friends that talk about pontoon boats. So I'm safe!

I came up with the idea of captaining the boat for my wife to have a "girls night" on the water. (she drives the boat, but I always do all the docking, loading, and backing duties. So I'll be captain and she'll get to host a night with the girls). She's super stoked to be doing this. (And hey, who am I to complain if I'm the captain for a boat full of hot women, right???)

sandm
08-01-2014, 01:46 PM
I bought my supra in '07 as an '06 new. sold in '12 and it still performed flawlessly. no real maintenance issues at the 350hr mark. a very solid boat that still had many great years left in her...
my current boat was what I traded for. I would really like to trade it in toward something that is a nicer color scheme and could lose some of the options I have on it, but knowing what I paid for it and what I would spend to replace for the same surf wave, I think I'll have it for many years, and with boat prices, unless there's another recession, I don't see myself ever owning a new boat again. pricing is getting real stupid..

my buddy has a mid-90's boomerang that is still running great, solid body and has had some upholstery work but still a blast to ride in. I see that boat running for many more years.

mikenehrkorn
08-01-2014, 03:04 PM
My wife has no use for the water sports

That's all of our worst fears....

Thank God, my wife grew up on the water boating and still has all the "tricks" -- skiing, wakeboarding and now surfing. And she turns the big 5-0 this year so I count myself very lucky.

My best scenario is that my two kids will be fighting over the boat in 8-10 yrs (they will be mid-20s) and my wife and I will head out on the pontoon to get in everyone's way like the pontoon-ers do to us today on our lake...

mikenehrkorn
08-01-2014, 03:06 PM
I came up with the idea of captaining the boat for my wife to have a "girls night" on the water. (she drives the boat, but I always do all the docking, loading, and backing duties. So I'll be captain and she'll get to host a night with the girls). She's super stoked to be doing this. (And hey, who am I to complain if I'm the captain for a boat full of hot women, right???)

There is only one downside I can see to that picture -- you can't participate yourself. Otherwise sounds like a hell of a deal to me!!!!

gregski
08-01-2014, 04:31 PM
I recently sold my '89 DD. It's 25 years old and still running great. I had to put a few thousand into vinyl but other than that had no major expenses. The steering and throttle cables have failed recently which is really about the worst of the age related failures. We only "upgraded" because we wanted a V-drive.

One thing to consider is how simple these boats really are. There's a motor, some cables, a (simple) transmission, a prop and a rudder. I'm actually wondering if the newer boats will last as long as the older ones due to the increasing complexity. For example: ballast system components, hydraulic systems for control trim tabs/wake plates, electronic controls etc. all add failure points that may require more dealer specific parts that will go obsolete at some point. I cringe thinking about the longevity of the newest wakeboard boats that have the fancy touch screen controller. I'm sure they are the slick, but how will you repair those when they fail after 10 years?

Sharpshooter
08-01-2014, 05:04 PM
Not counting bass boats
2004 stingray 190lx 2 yrs
2006 Moomba Outback 5 months
2013 Moomba LSV 13 months and counting
and looking to trade in on a 2015 MOJO

trayson
08-01-2014, 05:15 PM
There is only one downside I can see to that picture -- you can't participate yourself. Otherwise sounds like a hell of a deal to me!!!!

Yeah, but I can take one evening to spoil the wife and take in all the eye candy. Plus, I'll have plenty to look forward to when we get back home. hahahaha

tnbrooks01
08-01-2014, 06:26 PM
We swap boats every 2 years. We put lots of hours on them and move on to something else.

However, my truck is 10yrs old and the wife's car is 5yrs old with no plans to swap either of them any time soon.

Woody929
08-01-2014, 08:23 PM
For those that change so frequently, how do you come out on the right side of it? Or do you just accept some value of depreciation every year?

Cigars n scotch
08-01-2014, 08:33 PM
My '08 21v is our first and probably will be held for a long time (4 yrs so far) with the way boat prices are going, for something you can't even sleep in $100k is just crazy. But to each there own, if you got it you got it.

KG's Supra24
08-01-2014, 08:41 PM
Trayson, A night that ends with participation is usually a good night ;)

I'm interested in the loss y'all plan to take upgrading every two or three years and if you are starting with a significant amount down. I got lucky with my first purchase being timed during the industry incline (Nada now is what I paid 4 years, 400 hours ago) and am afraid of the cost to swap.

wolfeman131
08-02-2014, 10:00 AM
A boat, just like a car, is a financial expense, not an investment. But, how many great family memories have you made on your boat?

Love what ya got (boat & family), thank God for what ya got, forget about financial gains/losses and get out on the lake!

jmvotto
08-02-2014, 10:11 AM
A boat, just like a car, is a financial expense, not an investment. But, how many great family memories have you made on your boat. Love what ya got (boat & family), thank God for what ya got, forget about financial gains/losses and get out on the lake!

Amen!!.......

zabooda
08-02-2014, 10:56 AM
I've had mine for 13 years and this year is the first time for any major work. A carburetor rebuild was done. I determined I will continue with this boat regardless of the repairs as the boat is in great shape and going on 58 years old my water sports activity is sadly dwindling. With two knee surgeries, I may go to wake boarding.

jmb
08-02-2014, 11:41 AM
I've had mine for 13 years and this year is the first time for any major work. A carburetor rebuild was done. I determined I will continue with this boat regardless of the repairs as the boat is in great shape and going on 58 years old my water sports activity is sadly dwindling. With two knee surgeries, I may go to wake boarding.

Im 56 myself. I am slowing some too. These younger folks will find out in due time. Not really looking into buying another one. May be buying a 1930's hotrod. I could do some 360's in that, lol

VA LSV
08-02-2014, 11:53 AM
Bought our LSV new in 05 and the wife worried herself sick about paying for it. 3 years later it was paid for and now she says it was the best investment we ever made. 500 hours of family time on the clock with zero issues that required a trip to the dealer. Still get plenty of compliments on the boat but it is old enough that I don't worry when the kids take it out now with their friends minus mom and dad. Plan on keeping this one.