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Machine
07-11-2014, 01:14 PM
I've got a 2005 XLV and when I am at a decent speed, say around 25mph or above and try and make a "fairly" sharp turn, I can hear the prop start to slip(for lack of better words) in the water and the engine rpms spike momentarily. Is this a design issue with my boat?

I've noticed this doesn't happen with my friends Tige and his turns very sharp compared to mine. His is a 21" boat, I wonder if the shorter boat makes it turn that much better.

Ideas?

Kma4444
07-11-2014, 01:16 PM
Check the transmission fluid?

kaneboats
07-11-2014, 01:30 PM
Has your boat been repaired? Did they put in the right shaft? Are you running the right prop? Is your prop damaged? Where is your wake plate when this happens? Many things can affect this (often mislabeled as cavitation). Read this for more info:

http://www.boatfix.com/how/props.html

http://www.turbo-props.com/prop101.php

Best explanation of cavitation and ventilation:

http://www.boattest.com/resources/view_news.aspx?NewsID=3643

KG's Supra24
07-11-2014, 01:36 PM
Is all the weight in the front of the boat by chance?

Machine
07-11-2014, 01:42 PM
Has your boat been repaired? Did they put in the right shaft? Are you running the right prop? Is your prop damaged? Where is your wake plate when this happens? Many things can affect this (often mislabeled as cavitation). Read this for more info:

http://www.boatfix.com/how/props.html

http://www.turbo-props.com/prop101.php

Best explanation of cavitation and ventilation:

http://www.boattest.com/resources/view_news.aspx?NewsID=3643

My boat only had 80hrs on it when I bought it last year. It has the stock prop on it. I'm pretty sure it's never been taken apart. It's almost like when I turn sharp it allows the prop to either come out of the water slightly or the white foamy water is being taken into the prop and it slips or cavitates like you say.

Machine
07-11-2014, 01:43 PM
Is all the weight in the front of the boat by chance?

Hmm...never really paid attention. I know during some of those instances there have been people up in the play pen though.

Machine
07-11-2014, 01:48 PM
Where do you guys run your trim when cruising at speed not pulling a wake board? I have been running mine all the way down, because i've noticed it porpoising in the water if a have it up with people in it.

KG's Supra24
07-11-2014, 01:53 PM
Hmm...never really paid attention. I know during some of those instances there have been people up in the play pen though.

The reason I asked is because I used to experience the issue some in tight cornering when I was running bow heavy, pretty much no rear weight.

kaneboats
07-11-2014, 02:00 PM
You can run all the way down with no one up front. If you have bow weight it is better to go up almost a quarter on the wakeplate and get the bow in the air a bit. If you go higher than that you may experience porpoising.

Machine
07-11-2014, 02:32 PM
I might try raising the trim with more weight in the back next time just to see if it makes a difference. I was also wondering if having two scags in front of the prop disrupted the water enough coming into the prop to cause this. The scags seem to make it very hard to turn sharp also.

bergermaister
07-11-2014, 02:49 PM
Sounds to me like the prop is catching air... I had this happen years ago when pulling a tube hard with the stock prop and trying to slam through turns.

Do you really need the sharp turn at speed? Somebody may start getting on you about the "no-no" power turns....

kaneboats
07-11-2014, 02:58 PM
I was also wondering if having two scags in front . . .

Man, you got a Moomba. No reason to be hauling scags around anymore.

Machine
07-11-2014, 03:01 PM
Man, you got a Moomba. No reason to be hauling scags around anymore.

Can i take them off?

Machine
07-11-2014, 03:02 PM
Sounds to me like the prop is catching air... I had this happen years ago when pulling a tube hard with the stock prop and trying to slam through turns.

Do you really need the sharp turn at speed? Somebody may start getting on you about the "no-no" power turns....

Definitely what it feels like and it does happen when i'm pulling tubes...lol

bergermaister
07-11-2014, 03:10 PM
Man, you got a Moomba. No reason to be hauling scags around anymore.


Can i take them off?

I believe spell checker messed up that post and the g was supposed ta be "anks"... Just sayin

Machine
07-11-2014, 03:15 PM
I believe spell checker messed up that post and the g was supposed ta be "anks"... Just sayin

So it's ok to take the scanks off? :)

Haven't taken one off to see if it would leave holes in my hull or not.

bergermaister
07-11-2014, 03:18 PM
Definitely time to get rid of the skanks.

I'd leave the skags though. Maybe just quit trying to kill yer tubers.

Machine
07-11-2014, 03:24 PM
Definitely time to get rid of the skanks.

I'd leave the skags though. Maybe just quit trying to kill yer tubers.

LOL...went RIGHT over my head. My tubers are adrenaline junkies, they like living on the edge... ;)..of course they all complain the next day...lol

VA LSV
07-11-2014, 03:26 PM
Those are tracking fins and you don't want to remove them. You're cavitating your prop when the boat heaves over during the tight turns. You really don't need to turn that hard to throw people off the tube.

KG's Supra24
07-11-2014, 03:51 PM
+1 on not removing the tracking fins.

Machine
07-11-2014, 03:58 PM
Maybe i'm trying to make the boat do something it isn't designed to do, i'm going to adjust the trim and see what happens. I'm sure that it being 23ft instead of 21ft also makes a difference on turning radius.

Thanks for the input everyone.

KG's Supra24
07-11-2014, 04:06 PM
I'd still add weight to the back of the boat so the prop is deeper in the water.

If you are trying to throw people off the tube, look for some pulling techniques instead of speed.

Machine
07-11-2014, 04:34 PM
I'd still add weight to the back of the boat so the prop is deeper in the water.

If you are trying to throw people off the tube, look for some pulling techniques instead of speed.

Yeah, really the only time I encounter that is when i'm purposely pulling a tube to another place on the lake and needing to go faster, other than that, i usually go slower and whip them out.

Beejwest
07-12-2014, 02:45 PM
Definitely sounds like prop cavitation to me. When you load a prop wrong or too much they tend to do that. Essentially drops the pressure on the back side so much the water boils, creating pocket of air. Pretty cool physics behind it.

996scott
07-12-2014, 09:21 PM
definitely sounds like cavitation to me. My need to look at your prop and make sure you don't have any damage to it or you may need to upgrade it if you are running a stock prop.

ninedriver
07-13-2014, 10:58 AM
A few things to consider when pulling the dreaded tube. First of all I hope you don't have it hooked to the the tower, way too much load and could damage things. Second of all, if you have it hooked to the ski pylon like most everyone, that's still elevated enough that when you make a sharp turn the drag from the tube will actually pull (roll) the boat over more thus exposing your prop to a greater chance of cavitation.
Also, as far as tube pulling technique. When you pull from the ski pylon, it's a lot more difficult to whip the tube around because when you turn, the boat is almost pivoting around the pylon (just forward of it) and you lose that tail whipping movement that most of us are used to on conventional ski boats. If you have a transom attach point, you may try hooking a tube there, but your riders will have to deal with more spray generated from rope splash.

kevkev
07-13-2014, 12:22 PM
A few things to consider when pulling the dreaded tube. First of all I hope you don't have it hooked to the the tower, way too much load and could damage things. Second of all, if you have it hooked to the ski pylon like most everyone, that's still elevated enough that when you make a sharp turn the drag from the tube will actually pull (roll) the boat over more thus exposing your prop to a greater chance of cavitation.
Also, as far as tube pulling technique. When you pull from the ski pylon, it's a lot more difficult to whip the tube around because when you turn, the boat is almost pivoting around the pylon (just forward of it) and you lose that tail whipping movement that most of us are used to on conventional ski boats. If you have a transom attach point, you may try hooking a tube there, but your riders will have to deal with more spray generated from rope splash.

How does pulling a tube from the tower cause any more strain than pulling a wakeboarder who is cutting in the water?

beat taco
07-13-2014, 12:42 PM
How does pulling a tube from the tower cause any more strain than pulling a wakeboarder who is cutting in the water?

There is no way a rider can submerge and create enough drag to practically stop your moving boat.
While it rarely happens given the "perfect storm" should a wave hit your tube just right and take it under while you are more focused on fallen riders than the tube the amount of drag that thing creates is an attention getter! That is when towers get damaged. And you can pull a tube for years without ever submerging it but that one time it happens you will be glad you didn't attach it to your tower.

rdlangston13
07-13-2014, 12:44 PM
How does pulling a tube from the tower cause any more strain than pulling a wakeboarder who is cutting in the water?


I've often wondered this myself. If you wake board with a pretty big wakeboarder who knows how to build a good progressive edge and a lot of line tension it can roll the boat over too. Happens all the time on our boat, I can't see pulling a tuber applying any more stress than a 200 lb+ man edging hard...

moombahighrider
07-13-2014, 01:50 PM
Like jake said, if that tube gets under the water, that pressure far exceeds a big wakeboarder. That tube won't let go of the rope either.

Machine
07-13-2014, 02:25 PM
A few things to consider when pulling the dreaded tube. First of all I hope you don't have it hooked to the the tower, way too much load and could damage things. Second of all, if you have it hooked to the ski pylon like most everyone, that's still elevated enough that when you make a sharp turn the drag from the tube will actually pull (roll) the boat over more thus exposing your prop to a greater chance of cavitation.
Also, as far as tube pulling technique. When you pull from the ski pylon, it's a lot more difficult to whip the tube around because when you turn, the boat is almost pivoting around the pylon (just forward of it) and you lose that tail whipping movement that most of us are used to on conventional ski boats. If you have a transom attach point, you may try hooking a tube there, but your riders will have to deal with more spray generated from rope splash.

Interesting, I can see that happening. I attach the tube rope to the pylon. I'm going to pay more attention to if it only happens when i'm pulling a tube.

ninedriver
07-13-2014, 08:55 PM
That tube won't let go of the rope either.

Well said...

996scott
07-14-2014, 03:37 PM
I would never pull a tube from the tower. If you get slack in the rope of the tube (as you are whipping it around) and you have 2,3,or 4 people on a big tube, when that line goes tight it would put a HUGE jerk/pull on the tower. Just my .02